Sea life and humans

Sea life and people
| Photo Credit:
Prabalika M Borah

This month, Mumbai is festooned with a contemporary coat of color, because it embraces buildings, scaffolding, tree trunks and partitions. Continuing the celebrations of the a hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Mumbai Port Authority, the Mumbai Urban Art Festival (MUAF) has actually painted the city pink, and in addition white, yellow, and inexperienced.

MUAF on the Sassoon docks is an art undertaking that began in 2017 to revive the historic heritage of the 142-year-old docks. That 12 months St+art India basis, in affiliation with Asian Paints and 30 artists from around the globe gave the dock—dwelling and lives of the Koli group, an entire makeover.

Like yearly this 12 months too the art undertaking was about conservation and telling tales of the ocean and its individuals. This 12 months St+art India basis and Asian Paints with its motto ‘Art for all’ additionally determined to not limit art to the dock alone. Contemporary artist, creative director of St+art India basis Hanif Kureshi says “we wish to reclaim the streets to create art for all. Everyone ought to be capable to get pleasure from art of their on a regular basis life. Which is why many artists, actually anybody who looks like expressing themselves by means of art have joined us in work partitions and streets of Mumbai.”  

The pageant — an initiative of Asian Paints and St+art India Foundation — contains the current launch of the Asian Paints Art House at iconic Sassoon Docks. It homes three installations: one by artist Steve Messam (from the UK) and two extra by Ayaz Basrai (Busride studio) from Pune.

Sassoon Docks is without doubt one of the oldest dock in Mumbai. It was in-built 1875 by Sir Albert Abdulla David Sassoon, a Jewish service provider. It was Western India’s first ‘moist’ dock–one the place ships can sail in whatever the tide. Walking into this space is like stepping in an enormous fish wholesale market. .

The art house at the entrance of Sassoon docks

The art home on the entrance of Sassoon docks

Energy from particles

The Art House stands on the entrance of Sassoon Docks. On the primary ground conical constructions jut six metres out of the constructing. The set up is made with inflatable textiles, explains Steve, including that he’s demonstrating how air can air be a medium of art by spreading the fabric sideways. Steve makes use of the identical materials used bouncy castles to create his material art sculpture.

Steve’s set up portrays the co-existence of individuals. When requested why his constructions don’t level up in the direction of the sky, however are as an alternative parallel to the bottom, he says, “upward isn’t the one route. At occasions we have to unfold out and attain out.” 

Serge’s Sea never dies

Serge’s Sea by no means dies
| Photo Credit:
Prabalika M Borah

The second art work at The Art House by Ayaz portrays a ‘dwelling.’ Made of fibrewood, the set up reveals inventive dwelling in modular design. It is devoted to Mumbai’s dwelling house the place each inch is made to make use of to accommodate one’s belongings.

To create Currents, the third set up contained in the art home, with paint and gum Ayaz has repurposed particles, material (retrieved burlap from the dock) and different bits and items discovered across the dock to create an vitality vortex. The whirlpools of water in his art piece signifies water’s robust currents.  

Faces within the crowd

Inside Sassoon Docks, artist Paola Delphin from Mexico balances on a crane as she provides the ultimate touches to her work on a dilapidated constructing that’s about 40 ft tall, unfazed by the fishy pungency of the dock. The black and white work titled Humanity, within the type of road art, reveals the faces of a number of fisherwomen within the dockyard. Their faces replicate myriad feelings: persistence, happiness and disappointment. Through her work the artist says she desires to relate the tales of the individuals working at Sassoon docks.

Humanity by Paola

Humanity by Paola
| Photo Credit:
Prabalika M Borah

See the ocean

The partitions of the baraf karkhana (ice manufacturing unit) one other constructing on the dock has an untitled paintings created by 10 artists. It options hues of blue step by step mixing into a inexperienced, nearly mirroring the ocean. On them, in white, are fish of all sizes, turtles, aquatic crops, particles from boats, and nets. Swimming amongst them are plastic packets, bottles and rubbish, telling the story of how aquatic animals are compelled to reside with what people discard carelessly. Ironically, most onlookers simply use it as a backdrop for selfies, after which stroll away. Through this paintings the artists wish to speak about not littering the ocean.

Antonim Katre and his work

Antonim Katre and his work
| Photo Credit:
Prabalika M Borah

Opposite the baraf karkhana , Antonim Katre from Paris shakes his cans of paint, spraying color on his horizontal paintings on a constructing. Creating the impression of coming into a maze, the masked artist works with vibrant pink, orange and yellow, then attracts symmetrical panels over them in daring black paint. The work transports viewers into a seemingly unending hall of an enormous constructing. Inside the constructing is ‘Illusions’ put collectively by 10 artists. A playful collection of works, this takes viewers on a a path from darkness to gentle, a transition from depth to floor.

Sea of plastic

Sea Never Dies by Serge Attukwei Clottey from Ghana is part of an ongoing physique of labor referred to as Afrogallonsim. Through this paintings, he explores the themes of environmental safety and social justice. Sergei — an set up, efficiency and sculpture artist — has used tens of millions of similar plastic chips created from oil cans to create what appears to be like like a larger-than-life fishnet. The plastic chips are held collectively by copper wires to kind a internet measuring a number of hundred metres.

Rero’s work

Rero’s work

Beyond Sergei’s set up, lies French artist Rero’s untitled work comprising mirrors, black nets and phrases painted in mirror photographs (black lettering on a white wall within the artist’s signature strike-through typographic type). The set up is all about wordplay, reflection juxtaposes mirrors and fishnets that intrude with the studying, because the viewers attempt to disentangle the phrases ‘promote fish’, ‘egocentric’, ‘shellfish’ and ‘no selfie zone’.

The set up at Sassoon Docks, Mumbai, is up for viewing till February 22.

The author was at The Mumbai Urban Art Festival on the invitation of Asian Paints

. .