Park, whose 2004 Cannes Grand Prix winner ‘Old Boy’ went a good distance in opening the sluice gates for Korean filmmakers on the French Riviera, premiered his newest movie, ‘Decision to Leave’

Park, whose 2004 Cannes Grand Prix winner ‘Old Boy’ went a good distance in opening the sluice gates for Korean filmmakers on the French Riviera, premiered his newest movie, ‘Decision to Leave’

The internationally-feted South Korean director Park Chan-wook has his hat in the 2022 Cannes Competition ring with a movie that, in some ways, marks a major departure in model and substance from his earlier work.

Park, whose 2004 Cannes Grand Prix winner “Old Boy” went a good distance in opening the sluice gates for Korean filmmakers on the French Riviera and culminated in Bong Joon-ho’s well-known Palme d’Or win triumph with “Parasite”, premiered his newest movie, “Decision to Leave”, right here on Monday.

He doesn’t settle for that “Decision to Leave”, which is not as erotic as his 2016 Competition title “The Handmaiden” nor as violent as “Old Boy”, is all that completely different from the opposite movies that make up his celebrated oeuvre.

“This query wouldn’t have arisen in any respect had this been a movie by another director,” he says. “I met distributors from internationally right here yesterday and a few of them instructed that ‘Decision to Leave’ marks a brand new growth in my profession.” “I contradicted them. I definitely needed to make a movie for adults. But a movie for adults doesn’t essentially imply an erotic or graphically violent movie,” asserts Park.

“Decision to Leave” has been enthusiastically obtained right here. It is prone to proceed to be in Palme d’Or reckoning because the seventy fifth Cannes Film Festival begins to wind down and the Vincent Lindon-led jury sits down to select the eventual winners. Park is, after all, no stranger to prizes in Cannes. His 2009 movie “Thirst” gained a Jury Prize right here.

“Decision to Leave” focuses on a relationship that blossoms between a straight-laced and dedicated Busan detective (performed by Park Hae-il) and a Chinese lady suspected of the homicide of her Korean husband, who falls to his demise from a mountain. The position of the Chinese lady is essayed by Tang Wei, the star of Ang Lee’s “Lust, Caution”.

The hanging richness and depth of Park Chan-wook’s visible palette is intact in his new movie, which establishes the distinction between a mountain and a sea as a mirrored image of the variations that separate the policeman and the homicide suspect.

“Yes, the mountain and the ocean are omnipresent in the movie,” says the director. “Like the 2 characters on the coronary heart of the story, they preserve altering colors in response to the climate,” he explains. “That is how gentle works. Even a blue costume may seem inexperienced or turquoise as the sunshine adjustments.” About his penchant for display screen violence, of which there is solely a sparing use in “Decision to Leave”, Park says: “There are many administrators who excel at filming motion on the large display screen. So, I’ve all the time made it a degree to stay to my very own model – the violence I placed on the display screen is usually not fairly in any respect but it surely is important to the scenario.” Asked if the shifting love story in “Decision to Leave” has any private foundation, Park is fast to level out that he is not the type of filmmaker who turns to his personal life for inspiration.

“I don’t make movies to replicate my life,” he says. “I actually have no idea how a lot of my character and ideas have crept into ‘Decision to Leave’, however I agree that it is when persons are in love that they’re finest in a position to reveal their internal selves.” Park factors out that some journalists in Cannes have talked about Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo” as just like “Decision to Leave”.

“I wish to inform them that I didn’t have Hitchcock’s movie, or another movie, in thoughts when ‘Decision to Leave’ was being written,” he says.

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