A two-day exhibition in Thiruvananthapuram showcased 35 of his works in mixed media

A two-day exhibition in Thiruvananthapuram showcased 35 of his works in mixed media

Mysticism and Tantric art encourage self-taught artist Rajesh Vijaykumar. ‘Mystics’, a two-day exhibition at Museum Auditorium, Thiruvananthapuram showcased 35 of his works in acrylics, charcoal, watercolour and digital art.

Rajesh says he has been studying the Rig Veda and scriptures to know the symbolism and iconography of Tantric art. Abstract types and shapes depict advanced philosophical ideas that vary from the meditative to the disturbing types of the Universe.

Some of his greatest works are in charcoal, with painstaking particulars painted in with brush and charcoal mud. The play of sunshine and shadow give the work a three-dimensional impact, evident in the work of a standing Ganesha strumming a veena.

 ‘Anandhakkadu’ by Rajesh Vijaykumar has him imagining the mysterious, unopened B cellar in the Sree Padmanabha Swamy temple in Thiruvananthapuram

 ‘Anandhakkadu’ by Rajesh Vijaykumar has him imagining the mysterious, unopened B cellar in the Sree Padmanabha Swamy temple in Thiruvananthapuram
| Photo Credit: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

‘Anandhakkadu’, once more in charcoal, is on the mysterious, unopened B vault of the Sree Padmanabha Swamy temple in Thiruvananthapuram. Rajesh has picturised the underground place as one guarded by big serpents.

Another beautiful work is of an Aghori, an ascetic, together with his flowing beard, wrinkles and weather-beaten face. “I take pleasure in travelling and pictures, and a few of these snaps I clicked have motivated me to take the comb to interpret the pictures on canvas.”

‘Gangatharangam’, an attention-grabbing piece in acrylics, depicts the mythological story of the descent of Ganga by way of the matted locks of Lord Siva as she rushes down from the sky.

‘Gangatharangam’ by Rajesh Vijaykumar

‘Gangatharangam’ by Rajesh Vijaykumar
| Photo Credit: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

Unlike the sense of serenity and meditation in ‘Gangatharangam’, ‘Kamaghya’ appears to seize the damaging and violent face of Nature. “She represents Sati (in the Hindu Pantheon) and symbolises delivery and dying,” explains Rajesh.

Two of the items are digital art on canvas. One has a Theyyam artist in all his glory, whereas one other reveals a villainous character from Kathakali.

“The Theyyam portray was derived from {a photograph} I had taken in Kannur. I spend time with the performer to make sure that the intricate work on his face was reproduced faithfully in my work,” says Rajesh.

Rajesh takes a couple of week to finish one work, from its conceptualisation.

He can also be providing lessons in art and sculpting below the auspices of his studio, Acharya.

Contact: rajeshvijaykumar009@gmail.com

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