Sheejith Krishna and Sahrdaya Repertory’s ‘Dhwani’ stood out extra for its visible enchantment

Sheejith Krishna and Sahrdaya Repertory’s ‘Dhwani’ stood out extra for its visible enchantment

It is certainly an asset to have an skilled, and gifted staff of musicians for any dance manufacturing, and this was evident at ‘Dhwani’, Resonance That Paints’, the new work of Sheejith Krishna and Sahrdaya Repertory, for the arts competition organised by Alaapana Trust.

Sheejith Krishna’s ‘Dhwani’ Resonance That Paints, at Bharathiya Vidhya Bhavan, Mylapore.

Sheejith Krishna’s ‘Dhwani’ Resonance That Paints, at Bharathiya Vidhya Bhavan, Mylapore.
| Photo Credit: PICHUMANI Ok / THE HINDU ARCHIVES

Girish Madhu on nattuvangam, Ramesh Babu on the mridangam, Eashwar Ramakrishnan on the violin, Muthukumar on the flute, Ananthanarayanan on the veena and Rakesh Payyada on the ganjira shaped a formidable staff that supplied melodious music to match the vocal rendition of O.S. Arun. Together they seamlessly moved from one raga and tala to a different .

Not to be outdone, the group of competent dancers saved tempo, with their rhythmic footwork.

Lines from Dharu varnam ‘Mathe’ in khamas performed by the instrumental staff, alternated with sollukattus for the long-drawn introductory sequence of rhythmic actions. A thillana was a continuum to the track.

Abhinaya grew to become the centre of focus as three senior dancers, Manjari Chandrasekhar, Anjana Anand, and Sheejith Krishna, explored the concepts expressed in the Swati Tirunal, Behag raga composition ‘Saramainamaata’.

Diverse imageries

Sheejith Krishna, presenting ‘Dhwani’ Resonance That Paints, at Bharathiya Vidhya Bhavan.

Sheejith Krishna, presenting ‘Dhwani’ Resonance That Paints, at Bharathiya Vidhya Bhavan.
| Photo Credit: PICHUMANI Ok / THE HINDU ARCHIVES

Each explored the poetic imagery in the lyrics in their very own particular person approach. The lighting design (Venkatesh Krishnan), with the highlight shifting from one dancer to a different for every line of the track, helped the viewer observe every artiste carefully. A thillana adopted to convey again the deal with rhythm.

The joyous union of Krishna and gopis in raas leela carried out by 4 dancers additionally conveyed the splendour of nature. This piece once more culminated in a thillana.

Next got here a composition that featured six dancers, who, by rhythmic patterns and group formations, narrated the story of Kartikeya. Beginning along with his beginning, the six dancers as six kids come collectively as Arumuga. Then got here one more thillana.

The well-coordinated actions, easy entries and exits, aesthetically designed costumes and group formations revealed the efforts which have gone into placing collectively the manufacturing.

But one additionally felt the want for dancers and choreographers to be self-critical, to have the ability to fine-tune and edit their work earlier than staging it. Going on a rhythm spree with out an emotional anchor and packing in 4 thillanas, every lasting almost 10 to fifteen minutes, in a two-hour programme might be monotonous to look at. The idea of sound, its manifestation and moments of silences might have been explored in depth.

In truth, the night was extra about dhrishyam (visuals) than dhwani.

The Chennai-based author opinions classical dance.

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